Monthly Archives: March 2022

The Mass Airflow Sensor

The mass airflow sensor (MAF) is a key part of your vehicle's electronic fuel injection system. Typically located between the intake manifold and air filter, its job is to measure the amount of air entering your engine. The mass airflow sensor uses a small electrically heated wire called a hot wire to correctly measure the amount of airflow. The hot wire measures the air surrounding air and uses a small electronic chip in the sensor to communicate with the computer in your engine (PCM).   This communication is vital because the PCM uses the information from the sensor chip to keep the fuel and air ratio at the most advantageous levels for performance. The proper fuel to air ratio is critical for a properly performing engine. Running too much fuel is called running rich and doesn't provide enough air in your combustion cylinder. This causes worse fuel efficiency, rough idling, and black smoke from your tailpipe. On the opposite side of the spectrum, you have an engin ... read more

Signs of a Failing Starter

Signs of a Failing Starter

  As the name suggests, the starter plays a critical role in powering your vehicle. The starter is typically attached to the engine or transmission, the starter functions as an electric motor that kickstarts a complex chain of events to start your car.   So, what are the signs of a failing starter? Starters fail for design, lack of maintenance, or plain wear and tear. An important step is to listen up! The sounds you hear and the time it takes to start your car can provide critical information. A failing starter will occasionally give a clicking noise when the ignition turns. You’re hearing the starter’s solenoid activating without the starter motor powering up. Grinding and whirring sounds could indicate that your starter components are becoming worn. If you continue to hear grinding and noise after you start your car, that may mean that your starter relay is stuck, which, if unaddressed, can lead to severe issues down the line. We’ve discussed the ... read more