Monthly Archives: August 2018

What causes my ball joints to go bad?

Ball joints play a crucial part in the suspension of any vehicle. Ball joints are a ball and socket configuration that allow your wheels to turn and move vertically as the road changes. A comfortable and smooth ride is impossible without ball joints. Your car's ball joints are what connect your wheel and tires with the rest of your vehicle. When debris and water can get into the socket, ball joints wear down much faster because of the lubricant's declining quality. To get the most life from your ball joints, it's crucial to keep them lubricated with grease and ensure the surrounding rubber boot's integrity is intact. No matter how much you try to preserve your ball joint, natural wear and tear are going to occur for some vehicles. This makes an eventual replacement inevitable. Ball joint failure can be catastrophic. If the wear becomes bad enough, the stud may separate from the housing. This can cause immediate loss of control of your vehicle! To avoid this nightmare ... read more

How important is my serpentine belt?

Your vehicle’s serpentine belt is located in the front of your engine and transports power to important automotive components. The name serpentine is derived from the snaking, long, and winding nature of the belt. The serpentine belt is responsible for efficiently running your power steering pump, alternator, air conditioning, and potentially your water pump. You can expect your serpentine belt to last from 50,000 to 100,000 miles. An aging belt wears over time and can eventually crack and fray. Worn belts can become shiny in appearance and have a glazed look. When the belt and pulley system begins to fail, you may hear a squealing sound from your belt slipping or a bad bearing from your pulley. If you believe you have any issues with your serpentine belt, bring your vehicle to an ASE certified automotive shop such as Ferber’s Tire and Auto for a replacement

How often should I replace my engine air filter?

How often should I replace my engine air filter?

It turns out we’re not the only ones who need fresh air to properly operate. The engine air filter traps the pollutants and debris to keep your engine's peak performance and dependability. Engine air filters should be replaced every 30,000 miles, about the same rate as you would replace your cabin air filter. They are usually located inside a sealed box in the engine bay to ensure the air entering your engine is free from contaminants. If you fail to replace your engine air filter you decrease your miles per gallon and put a strain on your engine component. Bring your vehicle to an ASE-certified automotive shop for a replacement

How do I prepare my car for a road trip?

How do I prepare my car for a road trip?

Even though summer is winding down, many across the country are still taking road trips. Long drives are something a majority of Americans do every year so it’s extremely important to prepare your car for whatever may happen on the road. Here are a few things to check to ensure a safe trip. Check the quality and levels of your oil and if needed get an oil change before your journey.   Your windshield, brakes, power steering, and radiator all have fluids that are important to have topped off and properly working. For any fluids you’re unsure how to refill or flush, bring your vehicle to an ASE certified mechanic that can do it for you.   Air filters are easy to change and relatively cheap. They prevent all types of dirt and debris from entering your vehicle. It’s good to check your filter before traveling.   Look inside your car door to find out the proper inflation for your tires and check to make sure each tire matches the recommended level. &n ... read more

Why is my TPMS light on?

A properly inflated tire is critical to the proper handling of your vehicle. Properly inflated tires improve tire performance, load carrying capability, and reduce tread movement. You lose these benefits if you fail to pay attention to your TPMS light. TPMS stands for the tire pressure monitoring system. This system involves a valve and a sensor and lets you know if any of your tires are underinflated by 25% or more. It’s important to know that a dramatic increase or decrease in temperature can affect your TPMS system. There are other factors that can affect your TPMS such as a disturbed sensor, over-inflating, tire damage, or natural air loss over time. With so many different things that can trigger your TPMS light, bring your car to Ferber’s Tire and Auto for an inspection