Yearly Archives: 2021

What is a brake booster?

What is a brake booster?

The brake booster is a canister that sits between your brake pedal and the master cylinder. Much like power steering helps us steer, brake boosters help us in the braking process. Some breaking systems work at high fluid pressures, this has the ability to make our brake pedals hard to use. Brake boosters make this job easier. When you press your brake pedal, the booster supplements the force put on the master cylinder. Brake boosters contain a diaphragm that separates the inside into two parts that are both in a vacuum. As you press your brake pedal, it causes a valve inside of the brake booster to open, which allows air into one side of the booster. The difference in pressure on one side pushes the piston inside the brake master cylinder forward from the pressure in the pedal. This action is what assists your vehicle in coming to a complete stop. Without brake boosters, we would become exhausted from driving just from having to mash the pedal! Bring your vehicle to Ferber’s Ti ... read more

Why does my catalytic converter overheat?

Why does my catalytic converter overheat?

A combination of air and gasoline is forced into a combustion chamber where they’re burned and let out into the environment. Your vehicle’s exhaust emits toxic chemicals that pollute the atmosphere. This is where the catalytic converter comes in. The converter uses a catalyst that causes a chemical reaction. This reaction converts the harmful compounds into harmless compounds. So, what causes your catalytic converter to overheat? There are a few factors that can be the underlying issue. Leaking fuel injectors can cause unburned fuel to burn inside of the converter instead. The extra fuel melts and overheats the substrate. When there is too much air in the combustion chamber a misfire can occur. This is called lean burn. Misfiring causes extra hydrocarbon buildup in the converter. This build-up will clog your converter and cause it to overheat! A failing oxygen sensor is an oft-overlooked cause of overheating. Your converter links to oxygen sensors in your vehicle. These ... read more

What's the difference between disc brakes and drum brakes?

What's the difference between disc brakes and drum brakes?

As cars evolve, so do braking systems. Technology allows us to engineer the best parts to maximize safety on the road. So, what distinguishes drum brakes from disc brakes? Today we’re going to compare and contrast the two to better understand how they function. Drum Brakes: Named for drum-like shape. All brake parts are stored within the drum. The older of the two service brake systems. Rotates alongside the wheel. When the brakes are applied, brake, shoes are forced against the sides of the drum and the wheel is slowed. Prone to brake fade, where you lose braking power over time from the buildup of heat in the brake system. • Still used in modern vehicles, but usually just in the rear. Disc Brakes: Started appearing in the early 60s as an alternative. Built with a large metal rotor, two brake pads, and a hydraulic clamp called the caliper. More stopping power than drum brakes. Does a better job of dissipating heat than drum brakes. Easier to inspect ... read more

Why does my car shake when I use my brakes?

Why does my car shake when I use my brakes?

While driving your car, everything feels fine until you apply your brakes. All of a sudden you feel your vehicle shaking and you have a vibrating sensation going through your pedal and steering wheel. What’s the cause of this? Every time you apply your brakes, the friction causes you to naturally generate heat in your braking system. Over time this heat warps and thins the rotors flat surface and becomes uneven. This uneven shape will cause your brake pads to slip when you apply your brakes. This causes the pulsating effect you feel in the brake pedal and occasionally your steering wheel. While re-surfacing your rotor is an option in some circumstances, we recommend a full rotor replacement. Regardless bring your vehicle to an ASE-certified mechanic for a brake inspection

Why is my oil pan leaking?

Why is my oil pan leaking?

The oil pan is the reservoir for the oil pumped throughout the engine. It’s bolted to the bottom your engine and is usually made from steel or aluminum. Most oil pans have a pump that rests in the pan to force oil through a filter to move debris, dirt and other impurities that circulate through the engine. Pans contain a drain plug on the bottom so you can replace your oil. An oil pan generally holds four to six quarts of oil depending on what engine you have. Unfortunately, oil leaks are a common occurrence, and oil pans will occasionally contribute. The gaskets that connect the pan to the engine block can wear over time and allow leaking. An over-tightened drain plug, a bad washer, even rocks and debris from the road all have the ability to cause a major leak if gone untreated. Engines run so hot, that the high temperature can deteriorate the gasket over time. If you find a puddle of oil, never ignore it. Try to investigate the source of the leak if possible. As always, bring ... read more