Yearly Archives: 2019

Why does my transfer case leak?

The transfer case has the task of splitting engine power to all four wheels through the front and rear axles. They’re found in all four-wheel and all-wheel-drive vehicles. Your engine powers the transmission which then moves that power to the transfer case. Transfer cases send power from the output shaft through chains, gears or hydraulics. That chain sends torque to the front and rear driveshafts, which then deliver power to the axles. There are several different types of configurations for all-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. Each configuration uses a different type of transfer case. So, what causes the transfer case to leak? When it comes to the transfer case there could be a couple of issues behind a leak. The transfer case is a self-contained unit that has its own fluid. A leak could be from a bad seal or an issue locked within the case itself. The output shaft seal is the part of the transfer case that connects the case to the axle. Its job is to prevent fluid from lea ... read more

Why did my engine mount break?

Why did my engine mount break?

Engine mounts, (also known as motor mounts) are used to support the engine while is supplies power to the wheels. They secure your car’s engine and transmission to the subframe. Engine mounts absorb shock and vibration to make sure the driver doesn’t feel any movement of the motor. Typically, they’re made from two attached pieces of metal with rubber (and sometimes oil) between them. Due to the fact that they carry so much weight, most vehicles use three or four mounts for full support. These mounts keep the engine snugly attached to the chassis in the engine bay, so while driving uphill or on uneven roads you have little to no engine movement. With so much support, how do your engine mounts break? Well just like with most car parts, the answer is a combination of time and environment. While some mounts may last the lifetime of your vehicle, the rubber can really break down and ruin the part. Rubber is prone to dry rot from all the back and forth temperature changes ... read more

Why does my torque converter shudder?

The torque converter is what allows the engine to run in automatic vehicles while at a complete stop. It’s basically a hydraulic pump that ties together the engine and transmission. As automatic transmission cars don’t use a clutch to completely disengage, fluid coupling allows the engine to spin independently of the transmission. The torque converter is a sealed in a strong housing containing four major components; a pump, turbine, stator, and transmission fluid. So, what causes yours to rattle? It’s important to note that diagnosing a failing torque converter can be a complicated task. There are several things that can lie behind a rattle at the front of your vehicle. Narrowing down the sound to the torque converter requires acute listening and observation, and even then, it’s hard to be certain. The stator within the assembly uses a series of clutches that will cause a rattling noise when worn. Initially, you may notice a whine, or a light rattle while idle ... read more

Why is my U-joint squeaking?

Universal joints (also known as U-joints) are a vital connection between your vehicle’s driveshaft and axles. U-joints, allow driveshafts to move up and down along with the suspension while the shaft is moving so you can transmit power. They’re a pivot point that allows two shafts to rotate at the same speed no matter the angle. This flexibility allows the shafts to elongate or shorten to compensate for potholes and speed bumps out on the road. Without the u-joint and the connecting yokes, there would be no way to transmit power from the transmission to the wheels. U-joints are mostly found on rear wheel drive cars, four-wheel drive trucks, and SUVs at both ends of the driveshaft. Front wheel drive vehicles, on the other hand, use CV joints that also compensate for steering. So, what causes them to squeak? While the bearing components come factory greased, depending on the u-joint there may not be a grease fitting allowing for further lubrication. The bearings of each u-joint twist wi ... read more

Signs of a failing wheel bearing

Signs of a failing wheel bearing

The wheel bearing is a crucial part that allows the hub, tire and wheel assembly to work together. It allows for friction free movement of the hub assembly providing smooth wheel and tire rotation. The wheel bearings’ comprised of a set of steel balls held together by a metal ring. It rides on a metal axle shaft and fits snugly inside of the hub. It can be tricky to immediately diagnose a failing bearing, but here are some things to look for. One of the first things that will alert you to a failing bearing is a noise from the tire/wheel area. As you accelerate you may hear a faint grinding or grating sound as you pick up speed. This noise is heard especially between 15-50 mph and will increase in sound as the bearing condition worsens. Another thing to look for is wheel play. If your steering wheel feels loose while driving and you feel a lack of control, that could be a sign that your wheel bearing may need replacement. Uneven tire wear and car pulling could be additional symp ... read more